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Dream Big with Jill Jack – The Importance of Listening with Nadir Omowale

LISTEN HERE ON EMPOWER RADIO

Jill Jack is a 43 time Detroit Music Award winner who has traveled the world sharing her life experiences through song. What Jill has enjoyed the most over her 30 year music career was meeting people. Jill found that in sharing her trials and tribulations, her dreams and aspirations she connected with people of all walks of life. Her fans would reach out to her and ask for advise on how to pursue their dreams. Jill decided 3 years ago to create Dream Big Incorporated – a place where Jill could share her gift of believing in, supporting and guiding individuals of all walks of life pursue their biggest dreams! Dream Big with Jill Jack! A radio show that will inspire, educate, and encourage listeners to be and do what their hearts are nudging them to do.

Jill invited Nadir on her radio show where they talk about the importance of listening, being aware, and of actually putting the appointment in your calendar so your phone beeps at the right time.

Click HERE to LISTEN NOW

A Little Too Quiet: Nadir Omowale on the Ferndale Public Library Podcast

An AMAZING public library! That’s just one of the perks my family enjoys living here in Ferndale, Michigan, right across the street from Detroit. They are a forward thinking bunch over there on 9 Mile Road. Forward thinking enough to have funk music in the courtyard in the summer, and forward thinking enough to have a podcast! This was a fun and informative conversation. Check it out!

We’re chatting with singer/songwriter/producer Nadir Omowale, an award-winning musician and the leader of a formidable funk-rock ensemble. Nadir Omowale gave a memorable performance at one of our Summer Concert Series showcases, and it was with his advice and encouragement that we wound up substantially enhancing our gear game at the library, particularly when it comes to sound systems for live events. We spoke with Omowale about his love of music, but especially about the influence of not only icons like Prince, but his mother, who was a dedicated volunteer to community causes, including serving on her local library board.

LISTEN HERE:

‘Hard to Place’: Kelis, Kaliedoscope and Other Cautionary Tales

Kelis and her brilliant debut, Kaliedoscope, signaled another bright light in the loose non-genre that the music industry’s apartheid would probably call “Black Alternative” (or what others might call “Distorted Soul”). It was bold, brash and very good. But she ran into too many of the old familiar tales that plague so many artists.

From The Guardian:

As a musician, Kelis was often called “hard to place”, which is another way of saying that record companies and radio stations did not know how to sell her. Refusing to be restricted to the R&B and hip-hop boxes into which young black artists are often shoved, Kelis’s versatile, distinctive voice meant producers as varied as David Guetta, will.i.am and Dave Sitek were keen to work with her. She has made dance music, soul music and even – on my favourite of her songs, Like You, from her fourth album, 2006’s Kelis Was Here – sampled Mozart. But that variety may also have worked against her, because it means she does not have an easy, ready-fit brand. On top of that, she had a run of bewilderingly bad luck with record companies.

The story of the music industry is one of young artists getting ripped off, again and again, because they are too young to understand the contracts they have signed until it is too late. What is different in Kelis’s case, she says, is that it was her friends who ripped her off.

“I was told we were going to split the whole thing 33/33/33, which we didn’t do,” she says. Instead, she says, she was “blatantly lied to and tricked”, pointing specifically to “the Neptunes and their management and their lawyers and all that stuff”. As a result, she says she made nothing from sales of her first two albums, which were produced by the Neptunes. But she did not notice for a few years, because she was making money from touring, “and just the fact that I wasn’t poor felt like enough”, she says. She sighs: “Their argument is: ‘Well, you signed it.’ I’m like: ‘Yeah, I signed what I was told, and I was too young and too stupid to double-check it.’”

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The Oral History of Prince’s Super Bowl XLI Halftime Show

“And the LORD, opened up the clouds and a mighty storm burst forth from Heaven during “Purple Rain”. And THE LORD GOD, JEHOVAH/ALLAH/YAHWEH/JAH exclaimed: “THIS is my FAVORITE ARTIST, and y’all are about to see A SHOW!!”

This is a fun behind the scenes account of the legendary event. Also fantastic footage of Prince’s Press Conference performance.

From The Ringer:

“It was the most scared I was in my life,” says executive producer Charles Coplin, then the NFL’s head of programming. “And I’m sure I wasn’t alone.”

The man scheduled to perform was nervous, too. Yes, even Prince saw the potential for disaster. “People are like, ‘He gets nervous?’” says his musical director and keyboardist, Morris Hayes. “I’m like, ‘Yeah, he’s not nervous for himself. He’s nervous for us.’ He’s trying to make sure that we’re in the right places at the right parts. What’s gonna happen when it starts raining and the floor’s slick?”

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The Art of Deliberate Creation: “Use Me Up” by JusBam featuring Nadir Omowale Now Available on All Platforms

You have the power to create the life that YOU want to live. You know this, right? Students of the Law of Attraction call this, the Law of Deliberate Creation. It essentially means you get what you focus on, whether you want it or not, so it’s best to focus on the positive changes and developments that you want to create in your life. Seek and ye shall find. Ask and ye shall receive. Knock, and doors will be opened unto you.

Nashville emcee JusBam (Kyna Ealy) had a vision to create a project that could be a blueprint for anyone who wants to create the life of their dreams. She came to Detroit in 2019, and enlisted Nadir Omowale to help her bring her vision to light. Nadir worked on the track, an updated version of the Bill Withers classic “Use Me”. Nadir sang and plays most of the instruments here, along with Windsor/Detroit phenomenon Phil Whitfield, who injects some tasty organ, and Rashida Johnson and Ben Will who add spirit-filled gospel vocal flourishes.

In the end, JusBam manifested a funky track that provides a blueprint for you to attract and create all that you desire for yourself. Bam says, follow the steps she outlines here, just like she did – AND DOES – in all aspects of life, and you to can create the life you want to live for yourself. Bam just dropped the EP called Workin’ Contradiction, which she bills as “a preview of her next” full-length album project, and her dream is manifest right before your very eyes.

Listen to the track above, and purchase it from your favorite online retailer immediately, for a reminder on how to make the Law of Deliberation can work in your life.

The Wilmington Coup 1898: When White Supremacists Overthrew an Elected Government

Defeated white voters in Wilmington literally staged a violent coup to overthrow the democratically elected government of their city. Across the nation, similar acts of domestic terrorism crushed democracy in the United States.

Can this country truly be called a democracy when violence and racial intimidation overshadow voter rights and other forms of political power?

From The NY Times:

A town that once boasted the largest percentage of black residents of any large Southern city found itself in the midst of a systematic purge. Successful black men were targeted for banishment from the city, while black workers left all their possessions behind as they rushed to the swamps for safety. Over 60 people died. No one seemed to care. The governor of North Carolina cowered in the face of the violent rebellion, worried about his own life. President William McKinley turned a blind eye to the bloodshed. And Waddell was selected as mayor as the white supremacists forced the duly elected officials to resign.

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All US presidents are ‘captives of the military-industrial complex’: Scholar

“The continued occupation of Iraq and Syria by US military forces contravenes all international norms and standards. Both the Syrian government and patriotic forces in the Iraqi government have demanded that the US withdraw its military but to no avail. There is no legitimate reason for the continued US presence in either country.”

“It is not surprising that the illegal US occupation of both countries has elicited popular resistance. The people of every nation have the inherent right to defend their sovereignty and territorial integrity from foreign invasion. Thus, US Secretary of State Pompeo’s assertion that it is acting defensively in attacking forces friendly to the Syrian and Iraqi governments is completely without merit,” he added.

“But, it is standard American practice to cry ‘national defense’ when it engages in offensive wars of aggression. Every US president talks peace and wages war and Trump’s talk about withdrawing US forces from the Middle East is likewise so much blather,” he said.

READ MORE HERE

© Nadir Omowale